Robert William Blum, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.

William H. Gates, Sr. Professor and Chair of the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Robert Wm. Blum, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is the William H. Gates, Sr. Professor and Chair of the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Since 2007, Bob has served as Director of the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute. He is a past-president of the Society for Adolescent Medicine. He has also served on the American Board of Pediatrics. Bob is a past chair of the Alan Guttmacher Institute Board of Directors and served as chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Adolescent Health and Development. In 2006, the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine elected him into membership.

Among other noteworthy accomplishments, he is a consultant to the World Bank and UNICEF as well as the World Health Organization where he has served on the Technical Advisory Group of the Child and Adolescent Health Department as well as the Scientific and Technical Advisory Group of the Human Reproductive Program. In 1993, he was awarded the Society for Adolescent Medicine’s Outstanding Achievement Award and in 1998 was the recipient of the American Public Health Association’s Herbert Needleman Award “for scientific achievement and courageous advocacy” on behalf of children and youth. An international expert in adolescent health, Bob is an outspoken advocate for relying on people in the community to help with the search for solutions.

Bob has edited two books, and has written nearly 250 journal articles, book chapters and special reports. Most recently, Dr. Blum published papers on the connectedness of youth to their school and academic environment and on the health of our teenage children now versus in decades past, noting that over the past 25 years, there have been major shifts in causes of mortality and morbidity among young people between the ages of 10 and 24 years.